Tag: vol01

01(32): Should we abandon medical eponyms?

Which is the "correct" term: Alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer disease? Should the eponym be replaced entirely? According to the Wikipedia article on medical eponyms, "medical eponyms are terms used in medicine which are named after people (and occasionally places or things). In 1975, the Canadian National Institutes of Health held a conference that discussed the naming … Continue reading 01(32): Should we abandon medical eponyms?

01(31): How I chose the pieces for my piano exam, and what I could have done differently

In a previous blog post, 01(15), I discussed my musical journey from its very beginning. I highly recommend that you read it if you want an exposition on my musical journey. That blog post is a must-read if you are a frequent visitor to my blog! In this post, I would like to expound on … Continue reading 01(31): How I chose the pieces for my piano exam, and what I could have done differently

01(30): Think twice before swimming in warm freshwater lakes, rivers, and hot springs overseas?

What comes to your mind when you think of people swimming in warm freshwater lakes and rivers? For me, this thought conjures pleasant images of people relaxing in these water bodies. Some might even relax in natural hot springs. Usually, all is well and people are just enjoying their time away from work: the rat … Continue reading 01(30): Think twice before swimming in warm freshwater lakes, rivers, and hot springs overseas?

01(29): What do beta-lactams and perhaps the smallest known living organism have in common?

Yesterday, I was watching a video where the teacher had asked his students a question. He had just discussed how penicillins and cephalosporins can be used against certain bacteria, right after talking about Mycoplasma. The teacher then asked the class: "Which is Mycoplasma more sensitive to: penicillins or cephalosporins?" One student raised his hand and … Continue reading 01(29): What do beta-lactams and perhaps the smallest known living organism have in common?

01(28): Blood types, and converting type A to type O blood with two gut bacterial enzymes

NOTE: To make this blog post more educational, I have decided to come up with some questions throughout this blog post which you can contemplate to reinforce your understanding. My suggested answers can be found at the bottom of the post, just above the references. Feel free to give me feedback so that I can … Continue reading 01(28): Blood types, and converting type A to type O blood with two gut bacterial enzymes

01(27): Eh blarder, u god g6pd anot. dis g6pd si simi?

"Hey bro, do you have this thing called G6PD? What is this G6PD?" What do the title and the preceding sentence have in common? These are perhaps the words of full-time national servicemen, both 30 years ago and now respectively, to their fellow soldiers as they are left perplexed by the medical questionnaires they are … Continue reading 01(27): Eh blarder, u god g6pd anot. dis g6pd si simi?

01(25): The fascinating story of Helicobacter pylori

Ask any kid what he thinks of when he comes across the word "scientist". It is not surprising to hear scientists being described as weird, introverted, bespectacled old men with grey hair in white lab coats who do crazy stuff involving explosive chemical reactions in the laboratory. This stereotypical portrayal is perpetuated by the abundance … Continue reading 01(25): The fascinating story of Helicobacter pylori

01(24): Winning the genetic lottery for handspans as a pianist isn’t enough

The handspan, or simply "span", can be defined as the distance between the tip of one's thumb and one's pinky of the same hand. Understandably, a pianist is going to have a headache if his hand is not able to accommodate a particular series of notes as dictated on the sheet music. The hands are … Continue reading 01(24): Winning the genetic lottery for handspans as a pianist isn’t enough

01(23): The over-emphasis of patient autonomy under the guise of patient-centred care

One of my modules this semester is titled "Communication for Improved Patient Care". Yesterday, we had a lecture from 1-2pm, followed by a workshop from 2-4pm. The theme for this week was "Creating the right therapeutic environment". When delving into the realm of medical ethics and the nature of the relationship between doctor and patient, … Continue reading 01(23): The over-emphasis of patient autonomy under the guise of patient-centred care